Diamonds aren’t forever? Journey to the centre of the Earth: Part 2

Earthquakes and Volcanoes routinely emit flashing, transparent and colourful Plasmoids emerging like giant bubbles out of the ground! These chaotic electromagnetic formations come in many shapes and colours and can travel at supersonic speed whilst seamlessly passing through or, alternatively, boring through obstructions! Plasmoids reek fire and destruction and according to Egan Bach, they have burnt down cities and tunnelled through mountains!

In great fear the ancients called these ground emerging destroyers “Gorgons”. The Greek historian, Hesiod, highlights their power to petrify! It would seem that the Gorgons may have been active in Australian Aboriginal mythology. Verbal records and dance traditions recorded these demonic Plasmoids at many sites and in various forms. Their “Rainbow Serpent” was responsible for carving river systems (Lichtenberg scars) on the face of the Earth and even held responsible for building mountains and forming lakes. Fantasy you may ask?

I was fascinated to talk to Louis Hissink, a former “Diamond” geologist with DeBeers! He enlightened me on his escape from the confines of classical geological theory! The epiphany came when confronted with Aboriginal mythology that explained recent diamond formation in the Australian Kimberley!?

Rainbow Serpent diamonds Australia
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Antarctica Fossil Forests – Antarctic tropical forests fossilized – when, how and why?

Antarctica was not always so cold and remote. Geologist Molly Miller of Vanderbilt University discovered, in the Beardmore Glacier area of Antarctica, the remains of three ancient deciduous forests complete with fossils of fallen leafs scattered around the petrified tree stumps “These were not scrubby little things,” Miller said. “These were big trees.”

Unlike any trees today, Glossopteris trees lived in stands as thick as almost a thousand per acre just 20 or 25 degrees from the South Pole, latitude at which today they would have received no sunlight for half the year. This powerful evidence that when they grew the Antarctic was in a semi tropical zone. As for what they looked like, Glossopteris tapered upwards like a Christmas tree. Instead of needles, they had large, broad lance-shaped leaves that fell to the ground at the end of summer.

Miller says they lived at a time when the Antarctic climate was much warmer. Some are estimated to have attained heights of 80 feet (24.6 meters), based on their trunk diameter. Miller, Tim Cully and graduate student Nichole Knepprath came upon the three stands of the lost forests in December 2003.These trees are alive today but only grow in warm moist areas such as Queensland Australia.

The change that caused the electric fossilization of the trees probably resulted in a dramatic effect which most likely caused severe climate change . The same process would have destroyed the fossils of marsupials discovered underneath Antarctic ice.

antarctic tropical forests fossilized antartica
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Antarctica – once a tropical paradise?

  • The age of the Antarctic ice sheet is no more than six thousand years old
  • The validity of the Vostok Antarctic ice core methodology is disputed

Antarctica today is covered by an ice sheet up to 5 kilometres thick. It is the coldest place on Earth. It is amazingly the driest desert on earth with snow only falling around its wind blasted boundaries.

But it was not always so cold and remote. Geologist Molly Miller of Vanderbilt University discovered, in the Beardmore Glacier area of Antarctica, the remains of three ancient deciduous forests complete with fossils of fallen leafs scattered around the petrified tree stumps These trees are alive today but only grow in warm moist areas such as Queensland Antarctic also harbor’s bones of extinct marsupials and Dinosaurs with massive coal beds full of once flourishing flora and fauna.

antarctica tropical climate mystery puzzle
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Geological Anomalies – Wollangambie Crater

Situated about 100 kilometers west of Sydney in an area called the Wollangambie Wilderness, is what looks like a regular meteor impact crater. Cone shaped, it is roughly 2 kilometers across with a crater in the centre. The walls are around 80 meters high. It is on the local survey maps. Many people hike into the area to see it.

But assumptions can be misleading.

An assumption is basically a best guess in relation to the facts that are available at the time.

Let’s have a look at the facts. For one it is a crater but with a channel cut thru the rampart. It is not volcanic as the cone material is only sandstone with no signs of the basalt, etc. normally associated with magma. While the cone is overgrown you can still see large and small sandstone blocks scattered everywhere.

Now it starts to get interesting.

Wollangambie Crater, Sydney, Australia

Wollangambie Crater, Sydney, Australia


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Maori Mythology of Fires of Tamatea and Mega Tsunami

On the South Island of New Zealand, the Mahuika Comet impact would have been a dramatic event. Within 50 km of the southern coastline, it would have appeared as a fireball ten times larger than the sun, blown over 90% of the tree cover, and ignited grass and trees (Marcus et al. 2005). However, these effects would have ceased within 100 km of the coast. Steel & Snow (1992) believe that local Maori legends and place names refer to a comet event such as this one. They base their hypothesis on the legend of the “Fires of Tamatea” (or Tamaatea). Local ethnographic evidence is best chronicled in the Southland and Otago regions, centred on the town of Tapanui. Here there appears to be evidence for an airburst that flattened trees in a manner similar to the Tunguska event.

The remains of fallen trees are aligned radially away from the point of explosion out to a distance of 40–80 km. Local Maori legends in the area tell about the falling of the skies, raging winds, and mysterious and massive firestorms from space. Tapanui, itself, translates as ‘the big explosion,’ while Waipahi means ‘the place of the exploding fire’. Place names such as Waitepeka, Kaka Point, and Oweka contain the southern Maori word ka, which means fire. The local Maori also attribute the demise of the Moas, as well as their culture, to an extraterrestrial event. The extinction of the Moa is remembered as Manu Whakatau, ‘the bird felled by strange fire’.

maori mythology comets
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Michael Steinbacher – A New Approach to Mountain Formation

Michael Steinbacher pdf of his article on A New Approach to Mountain Formation – investigating Electromagnetic forces and how they may have helped form our landscape.

Michael Steinbacher - A New Approach to Mountain Formation

Ancient accounts from around the world describe a time when the air was choked with dust, sand, and falling stone. Floods, tsunamis, and downpours of water submerged much of the land. Oil also rained down day and night. Hurricane-strength winds scoured the earth.
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